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Andrei Cimpian

Section 1

Division: Developmental

Associate Professor of Psychology

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Specializations

  • motivation and academic achievement
  • gender gaps in achievement and representation
  • stereotypes and prejudice
  • explanation in everyday and scientific contexts
  • concepts, categorization, and inductive generalization
  • psychological essentialism
  • social cognition
  • language acquisition

Education

  • PhD, Stanford University

Courses

  • PSYC 216, Child Psychology (Fall 2008 - present)
  • PSYC 462, How Children Think (Spring 2009 - present)
  • PSYC 593, Language and Thought (Fall 2009)
  • PSYC 593, Causes of Academic Gender Gaps (Fall 2013)

Recent Publications

Tworek, C. M., & Cimpian, A. (in press). Why do people tend to infer ought from is? The role of biases in explanation. Psychological Science.

Hussak, L. J., & Cimpian, A. (2015). An early-emerging explanatory heuristic promotes support for the status quo. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 109(5), 739–752.

*Leslie, S. J., *Cimpian, A., Meyer, M., & Freeland, E. (2015). Expectations of brilliance underlie gender distributions across academic disciplines. Science, 347, 262–265. [* = These authors contributed equally to the work.]

Cimpian, A., & Salomon, E. (2014). The inherence heuristic: An intuitive means of making sense of the world, and a potential precursor to psychological essentialism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 37(5), 461–480. [target article with commentaries]

Cimpian, A., & Park, J. J. (2014). Tell me about pangolins! Evidence that children are motivated to learn about kinds. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143(1), 46–55.

Cimpian, A., & Petro, G. (2014). Building theory-based concepts: Four-year-olds preferentially seek explanations for features of kinds. Cognition, 131(2), 300–310.

Cimpian, A., Mu, Y., & Erickson, L. C. (2012). Who is good at this game? Linking an activity to a social category undermines children’s achievement. Psychological Science, 23(5), 533–541.

Cimpian, A. (2010). The impact of generic language about ability on children’s achievement motivation. Developmental Psychology, 46(5), 1333–1340.

Cimpian, A., & Scott, R. M. (2012). Children expect generic knowledge to be widely shared. Cognition, 123(3), 419–433.

Cimpian, A., & Erickson, L. C. (2012). Remembering kinds: New evidence that categories are privileged in children’s thinking. Cognitive Psychology, 64(3), 161–185.

Cimpian, A., & Markman, E. M. (2011). The generic/nongeneric distinction influences how children interpret new information about social others. Child Development, 82(2), 471–492.

Cimpian, A., Brandone, A. C., & Gelman, S. A. (2010). Generic statements require little evidence for acceptance but have powerful implications. Cognitive Science, 34(8), 1452–1482.

Cimpian, A., & Markman, E. M. (2008). Preschool children’s use of cues to generic meaning. Cognition, 107(1), 19–53.

Cimpian, A., Arce, H. C., Markman, E. M., & Dweck, C. S. (2007). Subtle linguistic cues affect children’s motivation. Psychological Science, 18(4), 314–316.

Cimpian, A., & Markman, E. M. (2009). Information learned from generic language becomes central to children’s biological concepts: Evidence from their open-ended explanations. Cognition, 113(1), 14–25.

Section 2

Sections

Facilities Information

Psychology Bldg Wireless Upgrade

Technology Services employees have been working over the winter break to upgrade wireless capability in the building. This includes installing additional routers to give us more access points. The basement and first floor are finished, and the workers will be working on the upper floors during the week and weekend to finish the upgrade as soon as possible.